Monday, July 18, 2005

Michael Jackson my ass.....

Alot of people have been talking about Michael Jackson being envisioned in Johnny Depp's portrayal of Willy Wonka. I find that kinda gay and I happened to not see any sort of Michael Jackson in the movie at all. Sure there were kids and he was pale. But to me it seemed like Willy Wonka didn't like kids in the film as opposed to Michael Jackson letting kid's touch his willy wonka. Anyways a recent interview with Johnny Depp on everyone's favorite movie site www.joblo.com had him address the comparison's between The King of Pop and the King of Candy.

"Have you heard the comparisons in your portrayal to Michael Jackson?

It actually never crossed my mind. Michael Jackson was not an ingredient or inspiration for the character at all. A few people have mentioned it and it kind of took me by surprise when they said that. I guess on some level I can understand there's the look a little bit but you can easily think of someone like a reclusive germophobe like Howard Hughes. The book was published in 1964 and Michael Jackson was just a wee lad. I don't think he was inspired by him either.
You've been open in the past about inspirations for your characters.

Where did Wonka come from?

When Tim and I talked about doing it there was no script at that time. It was, in a lot of ways, a great gift because I was able to use Roald Dahl's work for my notes. What I started to see when I was thinking about ii in my early research was children's show hosts from when I was 5 or 6 years old and watching "Captain Kangaroo" and "Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood" and local guys like "Uncle Al" (laughs) and "Mr. Greenjeans." And I remember thinking, even then, how odd it was the way that they spoke. That bizarre musical cadence to their speech pattern. That sort of, "Good morning children! And now today we're going to do..." So I took that and made that one of the main ingredients for Wonka and stretched it out a bit. And game show hosts. I remembered them from growing up with that perpetual grin on their face. I felt, they're certainly not like that when they're home - at least I hope they're not (laughs). They go on-stage, their thing and then take it off. It's almost like a clown. Those two things became the basis for this version of Wonka."

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